Minimize Ergonomic Risk Factors

The ergonomic risk factors that you should try to eliminate or minimize are as follows:

✓ Awkward postures
✓ Cold Temperatures
✓ Force
✓ Repetition
✓ Static Postures
✓ Contact Stress
✓ Vibrations

To minimize awkward postures:

  • Position your mouse next to your keyboard.
  • Keep your elbows close to your sides and your forearms parallel to the floor; adjust the height of your chair so that your arms are at a 90 degree angle.
  • When you adjust the height of the chair to put your arms in the proper position, if your feet are not flat on the floor, use a footrest (or a phonebook if needed).
  • Position materials you are referring to right next to your computer screen, so you don’t need to extend your head or neck.
  • Use a telephone headset if you can.
  • Put your feet flat on the floor.
  • Do not slouch.
  • Keep your wrists straight. Do not bend them forward or backward when typing. This pinches the median nerve, which can lead to carpal tunnel syndrome.
  • Minimize twisting your trunk from side to side; turn the whole chair with your legs instead.

To Minimize Force:

  •  Type with a light touch.
  • Pad hard surfaces. This will also reduce contact stress.
  • If your feet do not rest flatly on the floor, use a footrest. This will take the weight off the back of your thighs while sitting. It may also reduce the incidence of varicose veins.

To Minimize Repetition:

  • Break up long repetitious tasks, such as typing or computer work, with other tasks, such as phone work or errands.
  • Automate stapling, copying, and colating.

To Minimize Static Postures:

  • Try to change your position frequently throughout the day.
  • Take a break from intense work periodically; move around, or take a walk if you can.
  • If you cannot take a break, try to stretch your arms and/or put your hands at your sides and shake them out periodically to get the feeling back in your fingers; and try to stand up for 30 seconds every hour.

OSHA Whistleblower Online Complaint Form

Trade Release

Department of Labor, United States of America

U.S. Department of Labor
Occupational Safety and Health Administration
Office of Communications
Washington, D.C.
www.osha.gov

For Immediate Release
July 28, 2017
Contact: Office of Communications
Phone: 202-693-1999

OSHA revises its online whistleblower complaint form

WASHINGTON – The Occupational Safety and Health Administration recently revised its online whistleblower complaint form to help users file a complaint with the appropriate agency. The form provides workers with another option for submitting retaliation complaints to the U.S. Department of Labor’s OSHA.

The updated form guides individuals as they file a complaint through the process, providing essential questions at the beginning so they can better understand and exercise their rights under relevant laws. One significant improvement to the system includes pop-up boxes with information about various agencies for individuals who indicate that they have engaged in protected activity that may be addressed by an agency other than OSHA. The new form is available in English and Spanish.

“Workers who report unsafe conditions and wrongdoing have a range of legal protections from retaliation,” said Deputy Assistant Secretary of Labor for Occupational Safety and Health Loren Sweatt. “The revised online complaint form works to ensure whistleblowers file their complaints with the appropriate federal agency for prompt action.”

In addition to the online form, workers can file complaints by fax, mail, or hand-delivery; contacting the agency at 800-321-6742; or calling an OSHA regional or area office.

OSHA enforces the whistleblower provisions of 22 statutes protecting employees who report violations of various securities laws, trucking, airline, nuclear power, pipeline, environmental, rail, public transportation, workplace safety and health, and consumer protection laws. Detailed information on employee whistleblower rights, including fact sheets, is available online at http://www.whistleblowers.gov/.

Under the Occupational Safety and Health Act of 1970, employers are responsible for providing safe and healthful workplaces for their employees. OSHA’s role is to ensure these conditions for America’s working men and women by setting and enforcing standards, and providing training, education and assistance. For more information, visit www.osha.gov.

# # #